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From the monthly archives: April 2010

Jazz is hot. For the first time since three-chord rockers took over the popular music scene five decades ago, jazz is in resurgence with those young men, and women as well. High school jazz bands are knocking out licks sweet and hot in Sherman, Denison, Pottsboro and other schools in the area, so it seems appropriate that a new opportunity to further their musical education is coming to town.

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There are a dozen or so books on the shelf behind White’s desk in his office in the DSH Athletic office building. Churchill on Leadership is up there, so is Winning Maxims, but there is nothing about football, nothing about the Xs and Os of the game.
“The Xs and Os are a lot less than what people think they are,” he said. “The first thing I ask a coach in an interview is, ‘Why do you like coaching?’ The answer I want to hear is that they like kids. That’s the most important thing.

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Chance Dunlap

On April 25, 2010 By

Over the past two years, his work has grown in both subject and technique. Real changes began to take place last spring when Dunlap decided to go back to the source of his sculpture work—found objects. “I broke loose and created a body of work that was a total departure from what I had been producing,” he said. “I sort of went back to where I started and used mostly found objects. Those works were good for me; I felt that I needed a change.”

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Johana Hartjen

On April 25, 2010 By

Hartjen engaged in building a new body of work during late 2008. Her portfolio grew to include more of the small hand-altered photographic prints she had been experimenting with, as well as a variety of layered digital photography techniques. Her new interpretations of urban sprawl and decay took center stage at Houston’s Bearing and James Gallery during December.

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Stormy Weather

On April 24, 2010 By

Every region of the country seems to take a perverse pride in its own brand of nasty weather. “If you don’t like the weather in (Texas, Georgia, Maine, Wyoming—you fill in the blank) just come back tomorrow.” People love to boast of their triumph over adversity. “Why, it was so cold, the firemen just turned on the hose and then shinnied down the icicle that was formed.” It also is axiomatic that however bad it is now, it was worse back when. “Hot? Why back in the summer of (insert preferred year here), it was so hot that folks were baking cakes on the screened-in porch.”

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Lee Simmons vowed to avenge the guard murdered in the escape and stop the Barrow gang at any cost. He went to Austin where he met with Governor Miriam A. Ferguson. Simmons explained to her that extraordinary measures had to be taken right away in order to bring the Barrow gang to justice. He told Governor Ferguson that he was the very person to do it. She gave him the special powers he requested for this purpose.

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Shannon Cain

On April 24, 2010 By

“As our area becomes more suburbanized, I think it is important to present the natural history and heritage of our region so that we can stay connected with it. Artists have a unique opportunity to share and document that narrative for others. Art allows me the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors and explore my experiences and memories gained there in a new way.”

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2010 Art Issue

On April 24, 2010 By

The third annual Texoma Living! Art Issue introduces our readers to a group of local artists whom, if you haven’t heard about already, you soon will. At least, that’s the consensus of our panel of experts, who selected them all as talents to watch.

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Dana M. Handy

On April 24, 2010 By

“I want to look at a photo and have it transport me instantly to the moment I snapped the picture, so I can relive it over and over.”

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Montana on the Lake

On April 23, 2010 By

Giant pine and spruce logs—some of the largest diameter logs in North America—were cut and prepared for construction near their growth site, then transported over fifteen-hundred miles by truck to Lake Texoma.

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