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Posts by: Edward Southerland

Marion Wilson would not let a troop train pass through her town without being on hand to greet the soldiers, and on a cold Christmas Eve she brought most of the town with her.

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Cowboy with a Camera

On September 7, 2010 By

Photographer Erwin Smith of Bonham, Texas was to the American cowboy what Matthew Brady was to the Civil War. Smith captured the life of the cowboys of West Texas and New Mexico in a time when the West was changing forever.

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The Way North

On September 4, 2010 By

The way north was an old trace that lay along the great wrinkle in the earth that separated the Blackland Prairie to the east from the Southern Plains to the west. The trail ran from Southwest Texas north to present day St. Louis, Missouri, and for centuries it served as a conduit for trade and war and migration by peoples ancient and modern. It went by many names. Most referred to it as the Shawnee Trail, for the ancient Indian village of Shawneetown near present day Denison. The military route built by the Texas army in 1843 was called the Preston Road. It ran south from Coffee’s Trading Post in the Washita Bend of the Red River to Cedar Springs hard by the Trinity in what is now Dallas. For settlers heading to the Promised Land south of the Red it was The Texas Road, and for the drovers who pushed the cattle herds north it was the Sedalia Trail, the Kansas Trail, or just, the trail.

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Cowboy Radio

On September 4, 2010 By

“With so much trauma and stress over our country’s situation, it’s nice to have a little happy, and you’ve got to be happy around goats and Western music,” said Waynetta Ausmus. “Goats will make you laugh, and Western music will make you tap your feet.”

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“When I was 12, I began studying under Silvio Scionti, and he taught me how to make music come alive,” said John Sutton Shelton in an interview in 2003. Shelton was a child prodigy at the piano. During his senior year at Sherman High School, Shelton won a music contest that earned him a chance to play with the Houston Symphony.

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- The odds of a successful, long-term romantic relationship increase by the square of the level of initial hostility between the two parties involved.- Once you think you have killed a monster, you would best be advised to do it again; otherwise it will come back to life.

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The weekly Tuesday evening gathering at Four Rivers Outreach is a combination camp meeting, pep rally, Alcoholics Anonymous session, gospel song fest, and tent revival—sans the tent—with a leavening of motivational self-help positive thinking thrown in for measure. It starts with introductions. “Who’s here for the first time?” says the woman with the microphone. “Stand up and tell us who you are and how you got here.”

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Dinner on Deck

On August 5, 2010 By

Sometimes it is interesting to deconstruct an idea and trace how it came to be. The dinner party afloat featured in the following pages started out a long way from the tranquility of a sleepy cove on Lake Texoma. It began in early May as an idea for a party at a yet to be found Victorian manse.

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In 1937 Congressman Sam Rayburn led a contingent from Denison to a meeting in Louisiana that would lead to the construction of one of the largest man-made lakes ever.

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My Best Summer

On August 4, 2010 By

Summer seemed longer when we were young. It stretched from the end of May into the far distant September, and the prospect of using up that apparently endless collection of days seemed almost impossible. Each week seemed like a month, each month like a year.

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