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From the monthly archives: September 2010

Cowboys at Work

On September 7, 2010 By

The alarm sounds at 4am. In a dimly lighted barn the horses are fed and saddled, the stalls cleaned, all before the light of day, all before the real work can begin. The mornings may be routine, but the rest of the day is far from it.

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Cowboy with a Camera

On September 7, 2010 By

Photographer Erwin Smith of Bonham, Texas was to the American cowboy what Matthew Brady was to the Civil War. Smith captured the life of the cowboys of West Texas and New Mexico in a time when the West was changing forever.

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The Way North

On September 4, 2010 By

The way north was an old trace that lay along the great wrinkle in the earth that separated the Blackland Prairie to the east from the Southern Plains to the west. The trail ran from Southwest Texas north to present day St. Louis, Missouri, and for centuries it served as a conduit for trade and war and migration by peoples ancient and modern. It went by many names. Most referred to it as the Shawnee Trail, for the ancient Indian village of Shawneetown near present day Denison. The military route built by the Texas army in 1843 was called the Preston Road. It ran south from Coffee’s Trading Post in the Washita Bend of the Red River to Cedar Springs hard by the Trinity in what is now Dallas. For settlers heading to the Promised Land south of the Red it was The Texas Road, and for the drovers who pushed the cattle herds north it was the Sedalia Trail, the Kansas Trail, or just, the trail.

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Cowboy Church

On September 4, 2010 By

Cowboy Churches usually don’t have gymnasiums or ceramics classes. Rather than basketball or skate night cowboy churches host team roping, bull riding, barrel racing and other rodeo sports. The youngsters enjoy “mutton bustin” (sheep riding) until they are big enough to sit a saddle on their own. According to those who attend, Cowboy Church most often appeals because dress codes don’t exist, and the music is worshipful but it is country. With common decency applied, you really can “come as you are.”

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Taking the Bit

On September 4, 2010 By

“I don’t make a pretty bit. I don’t make a high shiny show bit. I make a working bit. Some say a bit is a bit. No, it’s not. It’s like any other working tool. You got to have different things for different horses,” Kirby said.

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The Texas Longhorn

On September 4, 2010 By

If you are looking for a Texas symbol as big as the state itself, consider the longhorns. They evolved from cattle brought to the Americas from the Canary Islands by Spanish explorers in the late 1400s and early 1500s. By the early 1800s wild longhorn cattle were common throughout Texas.

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Talk to the Horses

On September 4, 2010 By

“What you’re looking for is a partnership when you train them,” he said. “The horse responds to what you ask freely and without resentment, willingly. When you break horses, you’re breaking their will. They do the job but they don’t do it willingly. He [the horse] needs to be part of it. You need to be able to express what you want in a way the horse understands.”

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Cowboy Radio

On September 4, 2010 By

“With so much trauma and stress over our country’s situation, it’s nice to have a little happy, and you’ve got to be happy around goats and Western music,” said Waynetta Ausmus. “Goats will make you laugh, and Western music will make you tap your feet.”

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Four Rivers Outreach

On September 4, 2010 By

Folks like the Horns (Jeannie and Arthur) and the other volunteers are God-sent to touch people’s lives and give them a hand up. It is so easy to let this part of our community stay invisible, tucked away on the back streets and alleys. Imagine the courage it takes to be in that room on one of those nights, and admit to all that you are a flawed human being and that you are asking both God and neighbor for help.

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Better than Smoking

On September 4, 2010 By

ove, love, love your magazine. It’s a lot cheaper than smoking and without the mess, no odor and best of all it comes to you. No jumping in the car trying to find a place open at night.

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